TPP Bill passes its third reading in NZ Parliament

Hon Todd McClay, New Zealand Minister for Trade

The red meat sector will be welcoming the news of the passing of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement Amendment Bill – the TPP Bill – through its third Parliament reading yesterday.

Trade Minister Todd McClay has welcomed the news and says the passage of the Bill is a significant step towards New Zealand ratifying the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

“It will be a signal of the commitment that New Zealand has for the continued liberalisation of international trade.  At times, when there is uncertainty in the rest of the world, New Zealand’s consistent and trusted voice of negotiating trade outcomes that are good for our economy needs to be heard.

“Our vision for a mechanism to enhance trade between four countries grew into the largest trade agreement to date and which places us in the middle of a region encompassing nearly 40 percent of global GDP.  We can be very proud of that, but we must continue to push for new trading opportunities and to continue to push for trade liberalisation wherever we can,” says McClay.

The TPP Bill makes all the necessary changes to primary legislation required by New Zealand to ratify TPP. The amendments introduced by the Bill – and other related changes to New Zealand law – will take effect only from the date that TPP enters into force for New Zealand.

TPP provides for an initial period of up to two years for all TPP signatories to complete their own domestic procedures required to ratify TPP. The Government hopes that other TPP signatories will continue their efforts to complete their domestic processes.

“Whilst acknowledging that there remain obstacles to the agreement coming into force, we need to take time to allow the new US administration time to fully  consider its trade agenda.

“Until then, New Zealand will continue its own, well-proven path to openness and inclusiveness in the global trade arena,” says McClay.

For the red meat sector, TPP will even out opportunities against competitors in markets such as Japan for New Zealand meat exports.

 

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply